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Profit With Purpose by Anna Goldstein

Anna Goldstein is an NYU certified coach, entrepreneur, Huffington Post contributor, former nationally ranked tennis player and author. The Profit With Purpose show is an informative and uplifting podcast where Anna dives into lives of entrepreneurs, healers, and change-makers who are making money through living their purpose. The goal is to provide practical tips to inspire you to be profitable living your life’s purpose. As a student of psychology, new age thinking, meditation, mindfulness techniques and yoga, Anna weaves these spiritual principles into her show. Guests on the podcast have been Mastin Kipp, Kate Northrup, Jairek Robbins, and more. Find out more at: annagoldstein.com
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Now displaying: July, 2019
Jul 11, 2019

I talk to a lot of people who want to find more clarity in their lives. And I want to talk about subtle ways that can have a profound impact on your life. This is a practice that you can continue to do because once you connect with clarity, it doesn't stop there. It's a practice that you want to continue to engage in. 

Here are three steps.

  1. Reduce stimulation. We are living in a world where technology is progressing so fast but there's not an increase in human happiness. I think we're more distracted today than ever. And distraction pulls us away from our happiness. Sensory overload is an abundance of stimuli that is intolerable and it causes confusion. Evidence is increasingly showing that overstimulation is a major factor leading to anxiety and depression. How do we overcome overstimulation and stay focused in a world that is moving so rapidly and so quickly? We have to stay conscious of the amount of time we're spending in front of screens. That means your phone, computer, television, ipad, etc. You want to reduce stimulation and you can do that through meditation; spending some time sitting down quieting your mind and paying attention to your breath. You can also reduce stimulation by going outside and connecting with nature, taking a walk, going to a yoga class. Because when there's so much noise happening it can be really hard to find clarity because you just were inundated with too much information and your brain is confused and overstimulated. 
  2. Pay attention to your energy. Once you've reduced the stimuli, it's much easier to start to pay attention to your energy. That means noticing when your energy go up and when does it go down. It's really important to listen to your energetic excitement -- there are things that you're naturally excited about. I get excited when I talk about human potential. I have a client that gets excited when she talks about politics. I don't get excited when I talk about politics. You energy is giving you feedback about what direction is naturally exciting to you.  Start to pay attention. Maybe it's when you are talking about a certain subject matter. Write down what when you get excited, what are you doing? What are you talking about? What are you seeing?
  3. Design your life around the things that light you up and let go of the three things that no longer serve you. Now that you have written down and you know what are the things that light you up and what makes your energy dip, you can use that as a guide for a total brain dump for clarity. Brain dump how you can integrate the things that light you up into your life. Can you take a class? Write an article on a subject matter that interests you? As you take action, you'll gain clarity because clarity comes from taking action. 
Jul 4, 2019

In 2005 the National Science Foundation published an article regarding research about human thoughts per day. The average person has about 12K to 60K thoughts per day of those thoughts. 80% are negative and 95% are exactly the same repetitive thoughts as the day before.

If you're finding yourself cycling around negative thoughts you are not alone. What we need to understand is that we have a "negativity bias."

What does that mean?

It means we pick up negative information faster than positive information. And the reason why is because we're wired for survival. We are not wired for happiness. 

We've all had the experience of getting feedback and somebody tells us a bunch of positive information - things we're doing really well but then somebody gives us one piece of information that's slightly negative. And what do we seem to harp on? That one piece of information that's negative. And that's because we have a "negativity bias." We need to know that that's operating and it's operating to help us to protect us to look out for danger and to not believe those negative thoughts.

The way that you can start to change the pattern is by actively seeking the good. Dr. Rick Hansen is a neuroscientist and he talks about this concept of taking in the good and really absorbing it. You take in a positive experience for an extra 10, 15, 20 seconds. As you absorb these good moments what happens is they gradually weave good experiences into the fabric of the brain. Instead of good experiences being passing mental states, they become net lasting neural traits.

Here's how I practice this: When it's a moment that I see my son playing - I really take that moment in that moment of joy that I feel when I'm watching him play. If I'm driving in my car and listening to a song that I'm really enjoying --  I really take in that moment. Since the weather has been so nice when the sun is shining and I'm feeling the sun beating down on my face -- I love that really taking that in.

There's a saying in Tibet: If you take care of the minutes the years will take care of themselves.

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